What Making a Difference Also Brings

Workers on roof

You are not simply building a school with Mzungu Project.

Last week we discussed why education was what I chose when I decided to give back. If you missed it, click here! Today, I would like to focus on what a project of this nature brings to the community aside from a primary school building. It is truly amazing what can come together with an initiative such as this one.

The first result, of course, is to provide primary education to children who are in remote locations and have a hard time accessing other school facilities. This is an obvious benefit that we have already discussed so, what else? A LOT! Keep reading to know just a few…

Depending on the selected community, the school can also serve as a secondary school in the afternoons. Often times these remote villages lack adequate infrastructure to establish school buildings. But the building we build doesn’t have to just be for primary school children. Once they complete their school day, the facilities can help those who have already finished their primary school education. So two schools for the cost of one!

Another very important contribution is to local economy. Mzungu Project only hires local people for the construction of its schools so that the employment rate increases and so that the entire community has a part to play in the building of their school. Additionally, the teachers that are hired are local as well. As a result of this project, job opportunities are brought to the villages and the projects helps foster a greater sense of community togetherness.

Does it help the local economy in other ways as well? Well, families save money as they do not have to pay fees for the education provided at schools built by Mzungu Project. Normally, charging of school fees is a common practice in many remote and rural areas and this limits the ability for some families to send their children to school.

And what about the quality of life for the children? Many children have to walk countless miles to attend schools in other villages due to lack of locally-available schools. Mzungu Project is working to change that as well. We don’t build schools in countries and cities that already receive a lot of donor and NGO support.

We target the under-served areas with the highest unmet needs.

I could go on and on about the benefits of this endeavor (besides the fact of ensuring a better future for children) but, as you can see, they are really numerous. Supporting a project like this helps all these people at the same time. The impact is huge! And, in the end, we all win.

Think about it! And please feel free to comment. I wish to hear from you.

We are so close to start the construction of the next school!

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6 comments to “What Making a Difference Also Brings”

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  1. sikis izle - May 2, 2016 at 11:44 pm Reply

    Hallo und vielen Dank für dieses Blog ist eine wahre Inspiration ..

  2. Liberal Yank - May 3, 2016 at 4:34 pm Reply

    Another very important contribution is to local economy. Mzungu Project only hires local people for the construction of its schools so that the employment rate increases and so that the entire community has a part to play in the building of their school. Additionally, the teachers that are hired are local as well. As a result of this project, job opportunities are brought to the villages and the projects helps foster a greater sense of community togetherness.

    Hiring local construction workers and teachers is very important. I am curious about the effects on local construction material suppliers. From the pictures I am guessing you used locally sourced bricks.

    Was the brick maker able to obtain enough spare capital to improve productivity? If so, did productivity improve?

    Is there an option for locally sourced school supplies such as chalk, slate, pencils, and paper?

    Does it help the local economy in other ways as well? Well, families save money as they do not have to pay fees for the education provided at schools built by Mzungu Project. Normally, charging of school fees is a common practice in many remote and rural areas and this limits the ability for some families to send their children to school.”

    I am curious how long term funding is set up.

    Is there a plan to transfer funding to local sources once certain benchmarks are reached?

    • mzunguproject - May 15, 2016 at 12:19 pm Reply

      Hello! Thanks for your message. Answering your questions, we make our own bricks so no supplier is used (unless there is a shortage and time is up but the effect would be very small). Chalk and other school supplies are bought at bigger towns far away at this moment. There would not be (right now) enough demand due to lack of schools all around to have their own locally sourced ones. As for funds, the fundraising is done for the next school to be built. One at the time. The first one was funded by myself. This second one, with the help of family, friends, and people who are getting to know the project little by little. Of course, I am included in the funding. So far, budget has not been reached but I will make it happen one way or another. If funds ever surpassed the budget, they would go to improve facilities of the school if necessary or to the next school to be built. I prefer having a 100 really basic schools than 20 with better facilities. So far, this project is small but I want to make it as big as possible (and as people want). The more we are, the more we do! Cheers!

  3. sikis izle - May 7, 2016 at 8:17 pm Reply

    merci pour le partage.

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